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Average ER Wait Times

Belton Regional Medical Center

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Centerpoint Medical Center

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ER of Brookside

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ER of Olathe (freestanding)

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ER of Shawnee (freestanding)

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Lafayette Regional Health Center

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Lee's Summit Medical Center

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Menorah Medical Center

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Overland Park Regional Medical Center

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Pediatric ER of Overland Park

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Research Medical Center

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Cancer Screenings

A cancer screening looks for cancer before a person has any symptoms.

Cancer screening tests can help find cancer at an early stage, before symptoms appear. When cancer, or abnormal tissue, is found early, it may be easier to treat or cure. By the time symptoms appear, the cancer may have grown and spread. This can make it harder to treat or cure cancer.

It's important to remember that when your doctor suggests a screening test, it does not always mean he or she thinks you have cancer. Screening tests are done when you have no cancer symptoms. To register for any of the screenings below, please call (816) 751-3775 or (913) 236-8003.

Breast Cancer Screening Mammograms

Our experts recommend annual mammograms for women 40+. See availability for screening mammograms to your right (or below for mobile users).

Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Schedule a Screening Mammogram

Colon Cancer Screenings

Routine colorectal cancer screenings are one of the most powerful tools for prevention. That's why it's so important to schedule a colonoscopy. Colonoscopies are recommended for men and women beginning at age 50, or earlier if you have certain risk factors.

Depending on your personal history and risk factors, various screening options are available for the detection of colon cancer. Some of the screening options include:

  • Colonoscopy – one of the most sensitive tests available for colon cancer screening. Abnormal tissue can be removed during the exam. Pre-test preparation is required.
  • Fecal occult blood test (FOBT), or fecal immunochemical test (FIT) – lab tests used to check stool samples for blood. Usually repeated annually.
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy – screens lower colon only.
  • Stool DNA test – lab test used to look for DNA changes in cells, can also look for blood in stool. Typically repeated every three years. Less sensitive than colonoscopy at detecting precancerous polyps.
  • Virtual colonoscopy (CT colonography) – CT scan produces cross-sectional images of abdominal organs. Catheter is used to fill colon with air for clearer images.

Talk with your doctor about your risk for colon cancer and the screening option that may be best for you. Find a physician.

Are you at risk? Find out by taking a free online risk assessment.

Colon Cancer Risk Assessment

Lung Cancer Screenings

Low-dose CT imaging for lung cancer screenings. CT images are better at finding abnormalities than a traditional chest X-ray. The amount of radiation received during a low-dose CT lung cancer screening is less than the amount received annually from naturally occurring radiation that's present in the environment.

Testicular Cancer Screening

Most testicular cancers can be found at an early stage. Most of the time a lump on the testicle is the first symptom. Sometimes the testicle is swollen or larger than normal without a lump.

Most doctors agree that checking a man’s testicles should be part of a general physical exam. The American Cancer Society recommends a testicular exam by a doctor as part of a routine cancer-related check-up. Some doctors also recommend men self-examine their testicles monthly after puberty.

Learn more about testicular self-exam (TSE).

It’s normal for one testicle to be slightly larger than the other, and for one to hang lower than the other. You should also know that each normal testicle has a small, coiled tube (epididymis) that can feel like a small bump on the upper or middle outer side of the testicle. Normal testicles also have blood vessels, supporting tissues, and tubes that carry sperm. Some men may confuse these with abnormal lumps at first. If you have any concerns, ask your doctor.

Men with risk factors, such as an undescended testicle, previous testicular cancer, or a family member who has had this cancer should consider conducting monthly self-exams. A testicle can also get larger for many reasons other than cancer. In time you will learn what’s normal for you and will be able to tell when something is different. If you have risk factors or find something unusual or something you’re not sure about, either during a self-exam or at any other time, see a doctor right away.